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I am writing in support of I-Ho Pomeroy’s candidacy for reelection to the city commission. I-Ho has served on the city commission for long enough to become very familiar with our city’s problems and to learn how to work with our city’s many constituencies.

Most recently she has been the city commission representative on the city-county health board during the COVID-19 crisis. Despite some strong opposition, she supported measures to slow the spread of COVID-19, such as mask mandates, reduced indoor capacity, and shorter hours for bars. I-Ho has been a strong advocate for mental health resources, and for addressing problems for the homeless population. She was instrumental in providing resources to the Hope House and funding the warming center. While I-Ho knows firsthand the difficulties of small businesses and has taken some business-friendly positions as a commissioner, she has not hesitated to challenge business interests when it comes to limiting development to preserve open space and wetlands. She has worked to limit suburban sprawl into nearby farmland. She sees implementing Bozeman’s climate plan as one of the most immediate issues facing our city.

Decades ago, I-Ho married a native of Billings, moved with him to Bozeman, raised two children, and started her own small business. She grew it from a food cart at the farmers’ market to a very successful restaurant, I-Ho’s Korean Grill. Her community spirit is well illustrated by the many community fundraisers she has held at her restaurant. Last February she held a fundraiser with HRDC to develop tiny houses for homeless people, and the donations supported the design and building of a model tiny house. You can learn more about her background and her positions by visiting https://www.ihopomeroy.com.

We need a diversity of perspectives on the city commission and I-Ho provides an extremely valuable fusion.

Michelle Maskiell

Bozeman

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