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Authorities in Yellowstone National Park this week recovered the body of a missing 67-year-old Washington man along the shore of Shoshone Lake, officials announced Tuesday.

Search and rescue crews found the body of Mark O’Neill on Monday along the east shore of Shoshone Lake in the southwestern corner of Yellowstone National Park, according to a news release.

O’Neill was from Chimacum, Washington. He was a former National Park Service employee and had gone on a four-night backcountry trip to Shoshone Lake with his 74-year-old half-brother Kim Crumbo, park officials wrote.

Crews are still searching for Crumbo.

Crumbo, who is from Ogden, Utah, is a former Navy Seal and a retired National Park Service employee. A family member reported that the two men were overdue from their backcountry trip on Sunday, park officials wrote.

Search and rescue crews that day discovered a vacant campsite with gear on the south side of Shoshone Lake. They also found a canoe, paddle, personal flotation device and other personal belongings on the lake’s eastern shore, according to the park.

Ten crew members spent Tuesday searching the area for Crumbo on foot, according to the park. Grand Teton National Park interagency ship and crew were helping with air operations.

The average year-round temperature of Shoshone Lake — the second-largest lake in Yellowstone — is about 48 degrees, according to the park. At this temperature, the park estimates that people can survive in water between 20 and 30 minutes.

Park officials said in the release that they could not comment further but would provide updates “when appropriate to do so.” They also urged the public to keep their distance from law enforcement personnel, equipment and vehicles as the search and investigation continue.

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Helena Dore can be reached at hdore@dailychronicle.com or at 582-2628.

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